Author Archive | mala

New York Times : Tall as the Baobab Tree

The-New-York-Times

The New York Times  features Tall as the Baobab Tree in the Arts section. Or read it online!

“Conceived as a simple folk tale based on true events and using local, nonprofessional actors, “Tall as the Baobab Tree” — the festival’s closing-night selection — was directed by Jeremy Teicher, an American filmmaker working in the plain neorealist style of Satyajit Ray.”

NYTimes Baobab

 

 

Human Rights Watch Film Festival NYC – IFC Center, London, Toronto, Amsterdam

Human-Rights-Watch-Film-Festival

 

The closing night film is Tall as the Baobab Tree at the IFC Center in New York or at screenings in Toronto and London. The film intimately captures the emotions of the traditional and modern worlds colliding through the perspective of two young sisters in a rural African village. Through the film’s empathy, not pity, for the main characters and their story, we get a more personal understanding of the very challenging issues that countless young girls in the developing world must face.

San Francisco International Film Festival Interview

“With its honest performances, gentle pacing and subtle tone, Tall as the Baobab Tree captures the essence of African village life at a time when tradition and progress are actively colliding.”

On Blog Talk Radio : We speak  a new director, Jeremy Teicher about his first feature: Tall as the Baobab Tree Jeremy Teicher, Director / Co-Producer / Co-writer, is a Student Academy Award-nominated director whose first feature film, Tall as the Baobab Tree (Grand comme le Baobab)   (2012), is garnering acclaim from festivals around the world. Tall as the Baobab Tree won the “Best Feature Narrative” award from the Doha-Giffoni jury at Doha-Tribeca Film Festival and was ranked in the top 20 out of over 170 feature films by audience vote at International Film Festival Rotterdam. Tall as the Baobab Tree is inspired by Jeremy’s ground breaking documentary short, This is Us (2011), which was awarded a prestigious Lombard Public Service Fellowship, supported by Kodak, and earned Jeremy a nomination for a Student Academy Award.

SFIFF Salons invites Tall as the Baobab Tree

TallastheBoababTree_Sisters_PlayingSFIFF Salons invites Tall as the Baobab Tree director Jeremy Teicher to be a part of their unique, in-depth conversations led by filmmakers and industry professionals about major issues and ideas related to cinema. Jeremy Teicher spoke about how filmmakers can navigate creative and advocacy positions. ” [His] film is complex and aesthetically rich—reminding us of the power of film to explore the nuances of important global issues. ” See full article here.

Movies That Matter, The Hague

UntitledTALL AS THE BAOBAB TREE was viewed by Princess Mabel of the Netherlands at Movies that Matter, The Hague. The Dutch press reported “Princess Mabel is impressed by the film. “Super moving, “she says.”

Impact of the film on village school

school lunch room A huge smile in the school lunch prep room from the village where we filmed. We have just wired funds to cover lunches for the remainder of the school year.  Our contribution came from the money we have made from our festival screenings thus far.  Pictured here is one of the wonderful women who had helped feed our  film crew. Most children arrive at school without breakfast and will not eat until dinner. Lunch is hugely appreciated.

Rotterdam Audience Awards #8

Out of over 200 films, TALL AS THE BAOBAB is #8 in the Audience Award rankings .  “Hidden treasure at the Rotterdam International Film Festival.”  BBpPvavCcAArohS.jpg_large

 

Top 10 for 2012 Moving Arts Film Journal

From Moving Arts Film Journal   Top 10 list for 2012 ” As we reach the end of an inspiring year for cinema, here are ten titles that stood out in 2012, Tall as the Baobab Tree (Grand comme le Baobab) .” 

” For the respectful and collaborative way in which this American director went to Senegal to make a film that genuinely reflects locals’ experiences. The film’s atmosphere is gentle, realistic, and treats all its characters even-handedly, whether they are progressive or traditionalist in their views.”